The 5 Best Golf Driving Irons of 2019

The quality of the golf iron improves the prowess of any golfer. With many golf irons in the market, it has become challenging to know the perfect model to purchase and if it will be effective for the game. The success and ability of playing golf not only depends on the player’s skills but also the efficiency of the golf equipment available.

Irons come in a vast array of styles, all designed to suit different capabilities. Blades are aimed at the best ball strikers, and offer little to no forgiveness when you don’t hit the centre of the club. Cavity backs are aimed at those wanting a good degree of playability, so off-centre hits are less harshly punished. And super game improvement models tend to have wider soles, more offset and often hollow bodies to offer ultimate forgiveness and help launch shots into the air.

Which ones are best suited to you will depend on your ability, what suits your eye, and your typical impact pattern.

Editor’s Recommendation: Top 5 Golf Driving Irons

Top 5 Golf Driving Irons Reviews

1. Callaway Golf 2018 Men’s Rogue X Individual Iron

The Rogue X is an ideal driving iron for those who have gone past the beginner phase in golf who want to start practicing for competition. While it still has as much length as the driving irons that advanced players use, the best quality about it is the forgiveness factor. Executing a perfect golf swing is difficult enough as it is, but with the Rogue X, even a slight mistake will still produce a decent shot. One thing that is not very preferable about the Rogue X is that because it has a lot of forgiveness, it is slightly heavier than most steel clubs.

The Rogue X uses tungsten on its club faces and microspheres, which is twice as heavy as steel. This could present a problem with players who are used to their golf equipment that is made of steel. It will take quite a bit of practice to get used to this difference. That is another thing that the Rogue X sacrifices in favor of forgiveness. The description does state that a thin club face does perform better, but can also produce more vibration. The club faces on the Rogue X are not as thin, so they will not vibrate when an errant shot is made, but this also slightly takes away from the performance.

2. Cobra 2017 King Utility Iron

There are two things that the King, by Cobra, does. The first thing is that is its designed for distance and to replace certain drivers that take up space in the bag. Players who use the King can hit a ball for right around 230 yards with it. That makes the King ideal or a any given par 3 hole, where you do not need a driver but rather a strong iron when teeing off. The second thing it does is give the player options about the height and loft. It has adjustable loft settings, giving the player many options. Players also report that it is possible to use the King when in the fairway, making this a good club for long approaches to the green. There are a couple of things to watch out for, however.

First, because this club is labeled as a “utility iron,” it may trick players into thinking that it is an “all-purpose iron.” That is not the case. There is no reason for this to be the only iron in a player’s bag. There is still a necessity for irons with shorter distances, and if someone brings the King on to the course, they may think that they can get away with not using other irons. This is not the case. The other thing to watch for is the adjustable loft settings. It is very possible to line up for a shot and forget to readjust the loft. This could possibly result in a bad shot, even though the execution was good.

3. Mizuno 2018 MP-18 MMC Fli Hi Iron

True to the name “driving iron,” the MP-18 by Mizuno is designed to hit for very long distances. Players have reported that they have used this club instead of their drivers as it is much more forgiving than a driver. Because of its versatility to hit from a tee as well as in the fairway or rough, the MP-18 is decisively the go-to club for teeing off on a par 3 hole, and can provide distance that players would not be able to reach with a typical 3 iron on a par 5 hole. All things being equal, the MP-18 will allow a player to approach the green easily with three strokes on a par 5. The performance that the MP-18 promises will also allow a player to replace their hybrid clubs, as the MP-18 can hit for just as far.

There is one thing that players using this club need to be aware of however. The loft on the MP-18 is very low. 16.5 degrees is all a player gets with the MP-18, meaning that if a swing is slow, the ball will not travel fast or long. This can put players with slower club speeds at a disadvantage. Players who wish to replace their drivers and hybrid clubs with the MP-18 will need to work on their club speed in order for it to truly perform well for them.

4. Callaway Golf 2018 Rogue X Individual Iron, Senior flex

If you are an older player, it can be frustrating seeing younger players get the same distance with pitching wedges as you do with a 4 iron. The Rogue X Senior by Callaway is a definitive solution to this. Like the Rogue X with a stiff or regular flexibility factor, the Rogue X senior has Urethane Microspheres. This is especially good for the older crowd, as the vibrations produced by steel microspheres has a larger effect on an older player than on younger ones.

Similar to many other driving irons, the Rogue X senior is designed for long distances and for older players, it is decisively more preferable to a driver or a hybrid. It is possible for an older player to go to the Rogue X senior when teeing off on a short par 4 hole and succeed just as much as they would with a driver, because the Rogue X senior is much more forgiving than any driver or hybrid club. There is one thing that may confuse the older players who decide to turn to the Rogue X senior, however. That is the loft factor. The Rogue X senior has significantly more loft than most other irons. Combine this with the distance it can hit for, and it will take older players some time to get used to this.

5. New Cobra S3 3-Iron Uniflex Steel

Just like many other driving irons, the S3, by Cobra, is designed to hit for distances that are comparable to most hybrid clubs, while providing the forgiveness of a typical iron. The most notable thing about the S3 is that it has a stiff flex, but the shaft is steel. This is what gives it the uniflex feel. It is true that the flex is stiff, but the shaft is made of material that is usually reserved for a regular, or even a senior flex. The S3 itself is a rather heavy club, weighing two pounds.

This likely means that the club head is made of tungsten rather than steel. This allows for a lot less vibration on errant swings. The extra weight also complements the long distance nature of the S3. Connecting even with a slow swing will produce a very long shot. The extra weight of the S3 is also a bad thing about it, however. Because of the weight, it is not suitable for older players. Also, because it is heavier than the common driving iron, it will take some practice to master it as well.

 

Golf Driving Irons Buying Guide

When it comes to golf, there are two essential pieces of equipment that you have to work with: the golf club, and of course, the golf ball. Most people understand that there’s a lot that goes into buying a golf club, but those same people fail to realize that there are a few things to think about before buying golf balls, as well. Before you go out and accidentally purchase the wrong balls for your game, take a look at this helpful buying guide to help you along the way to a better golf game.

Construction

The construction of a golf ball is important to how it will react to coming into contact with the club. There are several different types of golf balls to choose from when it comes to construction, including one-piece, two-piece, three-piece, four-piece, and five-piece golf balls. Because each one is used for different reasons by people of different proficiencies, it’s important to do your own research before you choose the right one for your golf game.

The Spin
The spin of your golf balls is extremely important because it could literally make or break your golf game. When it comes to the spin of a ball, the ball you choose to purchase is entirely dependent on your own style of playing, so make sure to take that into consideration before making a purchase. 

Compression
When it comes to golf balls, the compression is a measure of the deflection a golf ball undergoes when it is struck by the club. The compression is measured between 0 and 200, with 200 being a golf ball that doesn’t compress at all. Typically, golf balls range between 50 and 100 in compression. Lower compression balls are a bit softer and compress more to create more distance. On the other hand, higher compression balls offer more control and are used by people who produce faster swings to compress the ball.

Do Golf Balls Make a Difference for the Average Golfer?


Like any other sport or hobby, there are different levels of proficiency when it comes to golf. And just like any other hobby, you might not want to invest a whole lot of money into it until you’re a bit better at it. If you’re just beginning to play golf, or perhaps you consider yourself to be an average player, then you have to think good and hard about the type of ball that you want to use. As we discussed before, there’s a lot of factors that go into choosing the perfect type of golf ball for your game, but you also have to take your own abilities into consideration before purchasing golf balls. As you may already know, there’s a significant difference in price between the different golf balls available for purchase.

As a new player of the game or someone who just likes to play every so often, you might want to think twice about buying golf balls that are a bit more on the expensive side. For example, if you find yourself hitting the ball into the water or against the trees, or you tend to lose a lot of balls, you might not want to buy top of the line golf balls until you get a little bit better. Because the more expensive golf balls are constructed for particular a particular purpose, they’re typically used by golfers that know what they’re doing. According to the experts, if you’re not serious about the game or you’re just beginning to harness the sport, then you should opt-out of spending an arm and a leg on golf balls, and purchase the cheaper ones, instead. If you don’t really care about how much you spend on balls that you might just lose anyway, then go ahead and get whatever balls you like!

 

FAQ


Do Expensive Golf Balls Make a Difference?

  • As we mentioned before, the amount of money you spend on golfs is a bit dependent on how good of a golfer you are. If you’re not the greatest golfer or you have a lot of learning to do, then the expensive golf balls won’t really make a difference to your game. On the other hand, if you’re a decent golfer and you spend a lot of time on the links, then you should consider purchasing more expensive golf balls.

Do Golf Balls for Beginners Matter?

  • When you’re a beginner you’re going to notice one major thing: you’re going to lose quite a few balls before you get better. With that being said, if you’re a new golfer you might want to buy the least expensive option, or you could even go with refurbished balls. There’s no need to spend a lot of money on balls that are going to end up in the water!

Are Low Compression Golf Balls Better?

  • Low compression golf balls may not be the best out there, but they’re the best for the novice golfer, junior golfers, or women golfers. Low compression balls create more distance and offer beginners the opportunity to shorten the course. If you’re new to the game of golf, then you should certainly consider getting low compression golf balls. 

How Does Cold Air Affect a Golf Ball?

  • Cold air can most certainly affect the performance of a golf ball. Cold air is actually denser than warm air, so it can create an additional drag on the ball. Experts say that the difference is approximately one yard of carry for every 10-degree change in temperature. So if you’re playing in 40-degree weather rather than 80-degree weather, you’re looking at a loss of four yards of distance!

Does Water Ruin Golf Balls?

  • It might be a little hard to believe, but water can indeed affect your golf ball. Even though it takes up to 12 hours of a golf ball being submerged for the water to infiltrate the inside, the impact of the water is irreversible. Needless to say, keep your golf balls out of the water and they’ll do just fine.

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